"Him."

Jul. 4th, 2013 10:13 am
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-He entered the room. I hadn't expected it, but there he was. I had been sitting in the hospital's ER room for about two hours now, watching screaming, frantic kids attached to their even worse mothers push their way through the chaos of stressed out doctors and tired nurses. The eruption of mess in the small room wasn't half as bad as outside the hospital, where dark film equipment was set up for filming some TV show or something. I hadn't paid attention when I was told. For the past while, I haven't been able to hear any of it, thank God, thanks to my headphones blaring some '80's rock here, '80's pop there. But when he came into my vision, even all that was silenced.
-He entered the room with a subtle swagger. His hands in the dark pockets of his pitch black jeans covered by his long, gray trenchcoat. He wasn't paying attention to where he was going, he was eyeing around the room just as I had been, but I wasn't anymore. Inch by inch, he eased his way towards the bench I was sitting on. Fixed on his face, I saw his head slowly turn in my direction, his sharp hazel eyes meet mine, and his mouth form a smile and move. Still staring in awe, I removed the now useless earbuds from my ears. I heard him speak. He asked to sit down.
I remember the first time I heard him speak. I was sitting at home late at night, curled up in a warm heap of blankets and pillows, eyes shot from being glued to my heated laptop screen, having just spent the last few hours on the internet. I had just finished watching the latest season finale of Parks and Recreation when I saw that the first season of the show he had been in was on Netflix. Interested in the hype from what my friends had fangirled about, I clicked on the first episode: "A Study in Pink."
-He sat straight as an arrow right next to me. His back completely erect, his neck parallel to the to the wall, his face forward. His usually curled black hair had been slicked back; as his hand stroked his head, slicking it even more, I was nearly compelled to reach out and touch it. His hands rested on his thighs. It was almost as if he were meditating. He smiled, and turned suddenly to look at me. His firm dimples formed, his British nose twitched only slightly, his celebrity teeth gleaming at me. He was about to speak; my heart kicked against my chest, longing to leap out and hug this man. But, it ceased when someone shouted his name.
-A portly man, no older than fifty, waddled in panting, sweating as if he were just in a sauna. "You're needed back on set, you daft wanker!" He yelled as he turned away and waddled back toward the doors, shoving his way through the grown children and their little offspring. Chuckling that he had to leave without saying anything, he stood up, collected himself, turned toward me, and stuck out his beautiful hand. Still stuck in this surreal rut, I slowly reached out and grasped his hand, all while still staring straight into those eyes of his. My hand slid off of his, and fell into my lap. He looked at the floor, chuckled to himself, placed his hands back into his pockets, and strode out of the hospital unnoticed. I had just encountered the breathing definition of gorgeous.
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-The desensitization of sin is the way people don’t put any caution into sinning. There are consequences if you do not break through the barriers of the naivety of sin, and consequences if you do. The consequences of both are displayed in the film.
-In the film, the two detectives talk about the sins that are done daily. How people are apathetic towards them and simply want to be alone and live their own lives.
-John Doe breaks through the barriers, and is chased by the cops.
-It is important to break through the barriers, but not as drastically and dramatically as John Doe did in the film. There is a point to which you can be aware to sin. The law is probably the biggest factor into breaking the barrier respectfully. One should definitely keep the boundaries of the law in mind when dealing with acting upon or not acting upon sin.
-The most extreme example, as shown in the film, is committing murders to show the seven deadly sins. As John Doe does, he sets out to show the world they live in the extreme obliviousness of sin. Each murder shows a different sin; each sin turned against the sinner. Near the end of the film, he explains how he was chosen by a higher power to show the world what happens if people do not break the naivety of sin. At the end, he completes his so-called “game”, and the result of that is left up to the viewer.
-If one does not break through respectfully, one could ultimately become oblivious to sin, and not know right from wrong. If so, people in your social circles may exclude you from things. Or, on the other hand, make you more involved; all depending on your social standing. But, in both circumstances, your personal salvation is at stake. The more you know about sin makes you more likely to be saved.
battle_flag73: (Default)
-The naivety of sin is the way people don’t put any caution into sinning. There are consequences if you do not break through the barriers of the naivety of sin, and consequences if you do. The consequences of both are displayed in the film. In the film, the two detectives talk about the sins that are done daily. How people are apathetic towards them and simply want to be alone and live their own lives. John Doe breaks through the barriers, and is chased by the cops.
-It is important to break through the barriers, but not as drastically and dramatically as John Doe did in the film. There is a point to which you can be aware to sin. The law is probably the biggest factor into breaking the barrier respectfully. One should definitely keep the boundaries of the law in mind when dealing with acting upon or not acting upon sin. If one does not break through respectfully, one could ultimately become oblivious to sin, and not know right from wrong. If so, people in your social circles may exclude you from things. Or, on the other hand, make you more involved; all depending on your social standing. But, in both circumstances, your personal salvation is at stake. The more you know about sin makes you more likely to be saved.
-The most extreme example, as shown in the film, is committing murders to show the seven deadly sins. As John Doe does, he sets out to show the world they live in the extreme obliviousness of sin. Each murder shows a different sin; each sin turned against the sinner. Near the end of the film, he explains how he was chosen by a higher power to show the world what happens if people do not break the naivety of sin. At the end, he completes his so-called “game”, and the result of that is left up to the viewer.
battle_flag73: (Default)
I. There are consequences if you don’t through the naivety of sinning, and there are consequences if you do.
a. In the film, Somerset and Mills talk about how people sin day in and day out.
b. In the film, John Doe breaks the barrier, and is sought after by the law.
II. It is important to respectfully break through the barrier.
a. It is important to keep within the barriers of the law.
b. You could end up being oblivious to sin.
c. People won’t want to make you a part of things; you’ll be “outcasted”.
d. Your personal salvation is at stake.
III. John Doe breaks through the barriers to show sin.
a. He commits the murders based on sin.
b. He explains his motives.
c. He completes his game.
battle_flag73: (Default)
Purpose: To justify John Doe’s actions and to argue the point using close-reading and evidence form the film.

Audience: A general audience, those familiar with the film.

Tone: Straight-forward, thoughtful, intriguing.

Thesis: In the film Se7en, the two main detectives believe John Doe’s actions to be acts of passion brought on by insanity, but they are, from Doe’s perspective, acts told to be done by God that show the world the universal inability to avoid sin.

Pattern of development: Argumentation-persuasion.

Organizational approach: Emphatic approach.



I. What are the consequences of not breaking through the naivety to sin? What are the consequences if you do?
a. The consequences of not breaking leads to a sinful life.
b. The consequences of breaking the barrier could lead to prison or bad standing with the law.
II. Why is it important to break through the naivety?
a. You could end up being oblivious to sin.
b. People won’t want to make you a part of things; you’ll be “outcasted”.
c. Your personal salvation is at stake.
III. John Doe breaks through the barriers to show sin.
a. He commits the murders based on sin.
b. He explains his motives.
c. He completes his game.

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